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Did Tyrone in Corrie receive the correct legal advice?

Canter Levin & Berg Solicitor Rebecca Finnigan comments on the current Coronation Street storyline.

Poor Tyrone Dobbs. Not only is he subject to violence from his Coronation Street partner Kirsty, but he has also received some rather dubious legal advice when Fizz ‘kindly’ relayed legal advice she had apparently obtained for him- that he should marry his abusive partner in order to obtain parental responsibility for their daughter Ruby. Whilst it is correct that marrying the mother of his child would achieve his parental responsibility for Ruby, it seems an ill-considered approach.


Being from Manchester, I love Corrie (perhaps a little too much). And I think this is a brilliant storyline, as it is often overlooked that sadly men can also be the victim of domestic violence- up to 40% of victims of domestic violence are male. But I could not believe my ears when I heard this legal gaff and feel the writers really did miss an opportunity to show the realities of just how someone like Tyrone can be assisted by receiving the right legal advice.


My first piece of advice to Tyrone would be to ensure both he, and more importantly his baby daughter, are safe and protected from his violent and abusive partner. If he feels there is an immediate threat from Kirsty, he should of course contact the police as an emergency. However he could also consider making an urgent application to the court for an Injunction (Non-Molestation order) which could offer him protection and an Occupation order which would exclude Kirsty from the family home.


As Kirsty and Tyrone are not married and Kirsty registered Ruby’s birth alone, Tyrone does not have Parental Responsibility for Ruby. This does not stop Tyrone from being able to make an urgent application to the court for an order concerning Ruby. As Kirsty repeatedly threatens to remove Ruby from Tyrone’s care, he could consider applying for an emergency Prohibited Steps order which would prevent Kirsty from removing Ruby from his care until the matter had been properly considered by the court.


Tyrone should also include an application for a Parental Responsibility order. If Kirsty does not agree for him to obtain Parental Responsibility by entering into a formal agreement, the court can be invited to make a Parental Responsibility order. It is very likely he will be successful in achieving such an order, as he is clearly very committed to Ruby and is making his application for all the right reasons.


Tyrone can also seek support from groups and charities such as ManKind Initiative who offer support to male victims of domestic violence.


Rebecca Finnigan is an accredited member of the Law Society's Advanced Family Law Panel and also a member of the solicitor’s family law association Resolution.


You can this story and more on our new Sud's Law blog, where Rebecca and others will be commenting on the legal storylines in TV soaps.


Domestic Violence Solicitors Canter Levin & Berg


Suffering domestic abuse, or seeing a relative or loved one experience abuse in the home can be an unpleasant and even terrifying ordeal. It doesn’t matter whether the abuse is physical, emotional, sexual or psychological or over what period the abusive behaviour occurs, domestic violence is against the law.


Canter Levin & Berg have specialist domestic violence solicitors who deal exclusively with cases involving people who have suffered abuse. If you or a member of your family is suffering from domestic violence or from threatened domestic violence in the home and you need legal advice, then our Rebecca and our other Family Law and domestic violence solicitors are here to help.


For more information about our Domestic Violence legal services, or for general Family Law advice, call 0151 239 1000 and ask to speak to a member of our Family Law Team.

By Rebecca Finnigan